Macalester Bell, “What’s So Special about Resentment

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Macalester Bell, “What’s So Special about Resentment? Hard Feelings and Disvalue Pluralism”

Hard Feelings - Macalester Bell - Oxford University Press

8. Macalester Bell, “A Woman’s Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion,” Hypatia 20, no. 4, Analytic Feminism (Autumn 2005), 87.

Hard Feelings The Moral Psychology of Contempt Macalester Bell

Macalester Bell works in ethics, moral psychology, aesthetics and feminist philosophy. Within ethics and moral psychology, she is especially interested in articulating an account of the appropriate attitudinal responses to serious immorality and injustice. As part of this project, she has published papers on forgiveness, inspiration, and the virtues and vices of anger. Her book, Hard Feelings: The Moral Psychology of Contempt, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013.

Macalester Bell
Macalester Bell is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and works in ethics and moral psychology. Her published papers take up fundamental questions concerning anger, blame, forgiveness, reparation, and inspiration.
Macalester Bell is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and works in ethics and moral psychology. Her published papers take up fundamental questions concerning anger, blame, forgiveness, reparation, and inspiration.
Macalester Bell is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and works in ethics and moral psychology. Her published papers take up fundamental questions concerning anger, blame, forgiveness, reparation, and inspiration.Other Mac traditions mentioned by alums include the annual snow brawl on Grand Avenue, Religion and Life Week on campus, the frequency of marriages between Mac grads, and the Macalester bell, which was said to ring whenever a student lost his or her virginity (for years the Mac Weekly carried a column called “Ringing the Bell,” which announced the engagements and marriages of Mac students and alumni). At a time when respect is widely touted as an attitude of central moral importance, contempt is often derided as a thoroughly nasty emotion inimical to the respect we owe all persons. But while contempt is regularly dismissed as completely disvaluable, ethicists have had very little to say about what contempt is or whether it deserves its ugly reputation. Macalester Bell argues that we must reconsider contempt's role in our moral lives. While contempt can be experienced in inapt and disvaluable ways, it may also be a perfectly appropriate response that provides the best way of answering a range of neglected faults. Using a wide variety of examples, Bell provides an account of the nature of contempt and its virtues and vices. While some insist that contempt is always unfitting because of its globalism, Bell argues that this objection mischaracterizes the person assessments at the heart of contempt. Contempt is, in some cases, the best way of responding to arrogance, hypocrisy, and other vices of superiority. Contempt does have a dark side, and inapt forms of contempt structure a host of social ills. Racism is best characterized as an especially pernicious form of inapt contempt, and Bell's account of contempt helps us better understand the moral badness of racism. It is argued that the best way of responding to race-based contempt is to mobilize a robust counter-contempt for racists. The book concludes with a discussion of overcoming contempt through forgiveness. This account of forgiveness sheds light upon the broader issue of social reconciliation and what role reparations and memorials may play in giving persons reasons to overcome their contempt for institutions. The Philosophy Department presents the Moral Psychology of Contempt Workshop. This two-day workshop features presentations and commentaries from Kate Abramson, Indiana University; Felicia Nimue Ackerman, Brown University; Nomy Arpaly, Brown University; Macalester Bell, Bryn Mawr College; Zac Cogley, Northern Michigan University; Stephen Darwall, Yale University; Bertram Malle, Brown University; Michelle Mason, University of Minnesota and Brown University; Ira Roseman, Rutgers University and David Sussman, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Macalester Bell

Macalester Bell works in ethics and moral psychology

Macalester Bell is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and works in ethics and moral psychology. Her published papers take up fundamental questions concerning anger, blame, forgiveness, reparation, and inspiration.

13. Columbia: *Macalester Bell

A Critical Analysis of Macalester Bell's Account of Contempt

The second Minnesota I.C.E. (International Conference in Ethics) will take place at the University of Minnesota on Friday, June 29 through Sunday, July 1. Speakers include Julia Annas, Macalester Bell, Garrett Cullity, Rosalind Hursthouse (via videoconference), Anselm Mueller, Rebecca Stangl, Karen Stohr, Christine Swanton, and yours truly. For details, see . Hope to see you there!

Macalester Bell

Oct 25: Macalester Bell (Columbia)

Of course, Strawson and Wallace are hardly alone in endorsingemotional theories of blame. While these “Strawsonian”accounts of blame focus on the reactive attitudes (particularlyresentment, indignation, and guilt), other emotional theories of blameare more inclusive. Susan Wolf (2011), for example, defends an accountof blame that emphasizes anger. Macalester Bell (2013a, b) argues for a“hostile attitudes” account of blame that includes theattitude of contempt as a blaming attitude. Consequently, what holdsemotional theories of blame together is not widespread agreement overwhich emotions constitute blame. Rather, it is a shared commitment tothinking that to blame is to respond to others' actions with anegative emotion.